Cryptozoology, Mythology, Rainbow Hill Meanders

Bulgarian Dragons

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Do you know anyone with wings under their armpits? Do you know any old crones or beautiful young women who are always followed by inclement weather?

  • If so you probably know the offspring of a Zmey or you may be rubbing elbows with a Lamia in human form.

All Bulgarian dragons are successful shape-shifters.

 The Zmeys are especially known for falling in love with and seducing humans. Which means they’ve spent a lot of time in human form.

Flower, Fuji X20

Zmeys are usually male and associated mostly with fire. There are records of a few Zmeyitsas (female) protector dragons and some accounts of the Zmey having an affinity for both fire and water. Most villages in Bulgaria have their own Zmey as protector. The Zmey battle the elements for the safety of crops and village. Mostly they battle against the Lamia, the female water dragons.

Another form of the Zmey is described as part snake, part bird and part human. No one can give an exact description because they can become invisible at will. Their battles with the Lamia often cause thunderstorms and lightning.

It is said if you eat the heart of a Zmey you can partake of their power. Considering how dangerous these dragons are, well, I think most sane people would give that a second thought.

Bulgarian female dragons, the Lamia (Lamya) & Khala (Hala) are powerful water creatures with little love for mankind and his settlements. The Lamia can stop the flow of water in a well or stream, or dry up lakes and cause drought. She can also create storms and pummel the fields with hail.

If your Zmey isn’t strong enough to defeat her then a sacrifice to her might ease her temper. I have not found any documentation yet that the Lamia has the power of invisibility like her male counterpart, but I certainly wouldn’t put it past her.

Lamias have been described in many different ways in many different regions. They all seem to be quite individualistic.

Various Lamia descriptions include:

  • 3 to 9 heads (Sometimes dog heads)
  • Long tail of a snake
  • Enormous
  • A large enough mouth to swallow a man whole
  • Sharp teeth
  • Yellow scales
  • Sharp-nailed legs (quadrupeds)
  • Wings
  • Snake-like
  • And of course the ability to shape-shift

121001 -  - medium-3

Zmey and Lamia, male and female, fire and water, locked in endless battle. I imagine that little dragons must come from somewhere so the conflict might be a little over-hyped.

Personally. I think powerful female figures can be intimidating in some cultures. In a more enlightened time perhaps there are reformed Lamia wandering among us and equally liberated Zmey who are no longer constrained by the notions of the past.

There is far more Bulgarian myth than I can share in one month. The richness of the tales and culture are staggering and well-worth exploring. I hope to return to this subject in the fall.

I leave you with another Bulgarian saying

 “Work like you’re going to live for 100 years, but live like you’ll die tomorrow.”

 ~ lisa

 Riddle Answers:

As small as walnuts, they sit in a low place, but they reach to the sky.

The eyes

What is the sweetest and the bitterest thing in the world?

The tongue

A world without people Cities without houses Forests without trees And seas without water.

A map

 I cannot emphasize enough that this is the spot to go for the best overall accounting of Bulgarian Mythology. http://www.spellintime.fsnet.co.uk/Folklore_Section_Background.htm

Bulgaria Superstitions and Folklore http://www.bestcountryreports.com/Soci_Bulgaria_Superstitions_Folklore.php

Bulgarian creation myth http://www.spellintime.fsnet.co.uk/Folklore_Section_Background.htm

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A-D, Cryptozoology, Mythology

Bulgarian Dragons

130719 -  - medium

Do you know anyone with wings under their armpits? Do you know any old crones or beautiful young women who are always followed by inclement weather?

  • If so you probably know the offspring of a Zmey or you may be rubbing elbows with a Lamia in human form.

All Bulgarian dragons are successful shape-shifters.

 The Zmeys are especially known for falling in love with and seducing humans. Which means they’ve spent a lot of time in human form.

Flower, Fuji X20

Zmeys are usually male and associated mostly with fire. There are records of a few Zmeyitsas (female) protector dragons and some accounts of the Zmey having an affinity for both fire and water. Most villages in Bulgaria have their own Zmey as protector. The Zmey battle the elements for the safety of crops and village. Mostly they battle against the Lamia, the female water dragons.

Another form of the Zmey is described as part snake, part bird and part human. No one can give an exact description because they can become invisible at will. Their battles with the Lamia often cause thunderstorms and lightning.

It is said if you eat the heart of a Zmey you can partake of their power. Considering how dangerous these dragons are, well, I think most sane people would give that a second thought.

Bulgarian female dragons, the Lamia (Lamya) & Khala (Hala) are powerful water creatures with little love for mankind and his settlements. The Lamia can stop the flow of water in a well or stream, or dry up lakes and cause drought. She can also create storms and pummel the fields with hail.

If your Zmey isn’t strong enough to defeat her then a sacrifice to her might ease her temper. I have not found any documentation yet that the Lamia has the power of invisibility like her male counterpart, but I certainly wouldn’t put it past her.

Lamias have been described in many different ways in many different regions. They all seem to be quite individualistic.

Various Lamia descriptions include:

  • 3 to 9 heads (Sometimes dog heads)
  • Long tail of a snake
  • Enormous
  • A large enough mouth to swallow a man whole
  • Sharp teeth
  • Yellow scales
  • Sharp-nailed legs (quadrupeds)
  • Wings
  • Snake-like
  • And of course the ability to shape-shift

121001 -  - medium-3

Zmey and Lamia, male and female, fire and water, locked in endless battle. I imagine that little dragons must come from somewhere so the conflict might be a little over-hyped.

Personally. I think powerful female figures can be intimidating in some cultures. In a more enlightened time perhaps there are reformed Lamia wandering among us and equally liberated Zmey who are no longer constrained by the notions of the past.

There is far more Bulgarian myth than I can share in one month. The richness of the tales and culture are staggering and well-worth exploring. I hope to return to this subject in the fall.

I leave you with another Bulgarian saying

 “Work like you’re going to live for 100 years, but live like you’ll die tomorrow.”

 ~ lisa

 Riddle Answers:

As small as walnuts, they sit in a low place, but they reach to the sky.

The eyes

What is the sweetest and the bitterest thing in the world?

The tongue

A world without people Cities without houses Forests without trees And seas without water.

A map

 I cannot emphasize enough that this is the spot to go for the best overall accounting of Bulgarian Mythology. http://www.spellintime.fsnet.co.uk/Folklore_Section_Background.htm

Bulgaria Superstitions and Folklore http://www.bestcountryreports.com/Soci_Bulgaria_Superstitions_Folklore.php

Bulgarian creation myth http://www.spellintime.fsnet.co.uk/Folklore_Section_Background.htm

Standard
A-D, Cryptozoology, Mythology

Bulgarian Dragons

130719 -  - medium

Do you know anyone with wings under their armpits? Do you know any old crones or beautiful young women who are always followed by inclement weather?

  • If so you probably know the offspring of a Zmey or you may be rubbing elbows with a Lamia in human form.

All Bulgarian dragons are successful shape-shifters.

 The Zmeys are especially known for falling in love with and seducing humans. Which means they’ve spent a lot of time in human form.

Flower, Fuji X20

Zmeys are usually male and associated mostly with fire. There are records of a few Zmeyitsas (female) protector dragons and some accounts of the Zmey having an affinity for both fire and water. Most villages in Bulgaria have their own Zmey as protector. The Zmey battle the elements for the safety of crops and village. Mostly they battle against the Lamia, the female water dragons.

Another form of the Zmey is described as part snake, part bird and part human. No one can give an exact description because they can become invisible at will. Their battles with the Lamia often cause thunderstorms and lightning.

It is said if you eat the heart of a Zmey you can partake of their power. Considering how dangerous these dragons are, well, I think most sane people would give that a second thought.

Bulgarian female dragons, the Lamia (Lamya) & Khala (Hala) are powerful water creatures with little love for mankind and his settlements. The Lamia can stop the flow of water in a well or stream, or dry up lakes and cause drought. She can also create storms and pummel the fields with hail.

If your Zmey isn’t strong enough to defeat her then a sacrifice to her might ease her temper. I have not found any documentation yet that the Lamia has the power of invisibility like her male counterpart, but I certainly wouldn’t put it past her.

Lamias have been described in many different ways in many different regions. They all seem to be quite individualistic.

Various Lamia descriptions include:

  • 3 to 9 heads (Sometimes dog heads)
  • Long tail of a snake
  • Enormous
  • A large enough mouth to swallow a man whole
  • Sharp teeth
  • Yellow scales
  • Sharp-nailed legs (quadrupeds)
  • Wings
  • Snake-like
  • And of course the ability to shape-shift

121001 -  - medium-3

Zmey and Lamia, male and female, fire and water, locked in endless battle. I imagine that little dragons must come from somewhere so the conflict might be a little over-hyped.

Personally. I think powerful female figures can be intimidating in some cultures. In a more enlightened time perhaps there are reformed Lamia wandering among us and equally liberated Zmey who are no longer constrained by the notions of the past.

There is far more Bulgarian myth than I can share in one month. The richness of the tales and culture are staggering and well-worth exploring. I hope to return to this subject in the fall.

I leave you with another Bulgarian saying

 “Work like you’re going to live for 100 years, but live like you’ll die tomorrow.”

 ~ lisa

 Riddle Answers:

As small as walnuts, they sit in a low place, but they reach to the sky.

The eyes

What is the sweetest and the bitterest thing in the world?

The tongue

A world without people Cities without houses Forests without trees And seas without water.

A map

 I cannot emphasize enough that this is the spot to go for the best overall accounting of Bulgarian Mythology. http://www.spellintime.fsnet.co.uk/Folklore_Section_Background.htm

Bulgaria Superstitions and Folklore http://www.bestcountryreports.com/Soci_Bulgaria_Superstitions_Folklore.php

Bulgarian creation myth http://www.spellintime.fsnet.co.uk/Folklore_Section_Background.htm

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A-D, Cryptozoology, Fonts

Dragons Part 1

D is for Dragonwick

Dragonwick by Andreas Höfeld  http://www.fontgrube.de/en/

I don’t usually reference to commercial sites, but this one was a wonderful find when I found out I could search by subject matter. Their other dragon fonts include: Dragonbones, Scaling the Dragon, Dragon, Dragon Order, Dragon Master, & Dragonfly, et al. http://www.free-fonts.com/font/dragon.html

Dragons

Red DragonBlack DragonWhite Dragon

As long as I can remember I’ve been fascinated by dragons. In my childhood the only dragons I could discover were in books and in Chinatown. Much to my delight that world has changed to include dragons everywhere you look.

Dragon myths resound in cultures from around the world. In some they are the greatest of monsters, and in others the givers of wisdom and strength. They are almost always enormous serpents, some with wings and some without. I have a couple shelves full of books about every type of dragon, their taxonomy and their places in our world. These would be my pet of choice.

Roughly the dragon is divided into two main groups: the European dragon and the Asian dragon.

Linguistically speaking, and who doesn’t want to speak linguistically?, for us English speakers the word dragon is from the Old French word dragon which came from the Latin draconem (nominative draco) meaning “huge serpent” which in turn came from the Greek drakon meaning a “serpent of huge size, giant seafish”.   When it comes to dragons all of these little details are important to me.

Dragons roam myth and legend in far too many cultures to list all of them in a single blog (thus Dragons Part 1, then Part II, then Part III), but some form of dragon has been around since the beginning of our recorded time and probably dates back even farther to prehistoric Indo-European mythology. There are references to dragons from Canaanite, Hebrew, Ugaritic, and Hittite cultures. Out of all those early dragons the most famous and recognizable is probably Humbaba from the Epic of Gilgamesh. Humbaba is described as a dragon-fanged, fire-breathing beast.

http://gilgamesh.psnc.pl/index.html For a some beautiful interpretive visuals.

http://ancienthistory.about.com/gi/o.htm?zi=1/XJ&zTi=1&sdn=ancienthistory&cdn=education&tm=17&f=10&tt=14&bt=2&bts=52&zu=http%3A//www.mythome.org/Gilgamesh.html The translations tablet by tablet

IN THE ILLIAD, Agamemnon is supposed to have a blue dragon motif on his sword belt and a 3-headed dragon in his breastplate. Though the Greek word used could also denote a snake. The jury is still out on that one.

In the interest of keeping this short and readable, I will defer most dragon descriptions, myths and comments to later blogs. For now a few tantalizing tidbits

USES FOR DRAGON PARTS

BLOOD: Some uses that slain dragons have been accredited with: blood that is either poisonous or of incredible healing power. Dragon blood can also render skin invincible to those who bath in it. The blood can seep through iron, but is also is said to be so vile that the earth will not absorb it.

TEETH: Planting dragon teeth is planting an army of invincible warriors

TREASURE: there are always the dragon hoards of great treasure or great wisdom and knowledge.

IN RUSSIA dragons usually have heads in threes that will grow back if every head isn’t cut off. The most known version of three-headed Russian dragons portrays them as green, walking on two back paws and spitting fire. Many references to Russian dragons are found in Bylina (also Bylyna) which oral epic narrative poems. A lot of great Russian folklore in these.

IN INDIA the dragon is the personification of drought and enemy of Indra.

IN VIETNAM According to ancient myth the Vietnamese people are descended from a dragon and a fairy. For the Vietnamese the dragon brings the rain essential to agriculture. http://www.haivenu-vietnam.com/vietnam-culture-myths.htm

BIBLICAL REFERENCES. Starting with just two.

Job 26:13 “By his breath the skies became fair; his hand pierced the gliding serpent” or “By His Spirit He hath garnished the heavens; His hand hath formed the crooked serpent.

Isaiah 27:1 “In that day the Lord with his sore and great and strong sword shall punish leviathan the piercing serpent, even leviathan that crooked serpent; and he shall slay the dragon that is in the sea” or “the Lord will punish with his sword—    his fierce, great and powerful sword—Leviathan the gliding serpent,    Leviathan the coiling serpent;he will slay the monster of the sea1In that day the Lord with his sore and great and strong sword shall punish leviathan the piercing serpent, even leviathan that crooked serpent; and he shall slay the dragon that is in the sea.”

ASIAN DRAGONS will have their own blog, but to tide you over I’ll let you know that Japanese dragons usually only have three claws. They are usually benevolent, associated with water, and may grant wishes.

Dachshunds Part 1

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Dachshunds were bred to chase and flush out badgers and have a stubborn enough temperament to do just that. Its name is Germanic and literally means “Badger dog:” Of course, Arna is sweet, though I must say she is used to getting her way. She does an excellent job of putting up with the Bengals and all the Bengal antics.

Dachshund baby pictureWalking the dog

Back to dragons. There is also the schizophrenic dragon Yidra, That debuts in my novel “Mage of Cliffport”.

Finally in cartography dragons are used to denote dangerous or unexplored territories. Or in my case, the welcome sign to my lair

Beyond This Place There Be Dragons

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